Gabriela Marcu

Gabriela Marcu

Gabriela Marcu
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania


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NCWIT Pacesetters Carnegie Mellon University - Gabriela Marcu Gabriela Marcu: I'm Gabriela Marcu, and I'm a Ph.D. student in Human Computer Interaction at Carnegie Mellon University. At Carnegie Mellon, we're building a culture and environment that works well for both men and women. Our campus-wide philosophy is that diversity of people and ideas enriches research and education. We have a strong, visible, and active community of women that serves all students in our School of Computer Science. That’s women at SCS. Our approach is two-fold. First, we're building a community on our campus by connecting women of all levels and departments and offering professional development programs. This helps with our retention efforts and sharpens the professional skills of our students. Second, our women at SCS outreach programs are helping to spread the word about this exciting field, broaden the image of who can be in computer science, and engage students and teachers with computational thinking and hands on computer science activities. Every year we reach thousands of students and teachers in K through 12 in multiple states with our programs. We've seen a steady demand for our outreach programs and a growth spurt in enrollment into our undergraduate programs. In 2010, we graduated 20 percent women with bachelor’s degrees. In 2011, we enrolled 32 percent -- new women -- to our undergraduate programs. At Carnegie Mellon, we're not only helping to increase the number of women in computer science, but also building the next generation of leaders in the field. Transcription by CastingWords

My Story...

In October 2011, I sat in the red chair to share progress towards our goal. Pacesetters motivated our Director of Women@SCS, Dr. Carol Frieze, to build an advisory team of CMU faculty headed by our Dean that resulted in a two-fold approach. First, we have fostered an on-campus community that includes mentor programs, connects women across all levels and departments, and offers professional development workshops and invited speakers, all of which help our retention efforts and sharpen student professional skills. Second, our outreach programs are helping to spread the word about this exciting field, to broaden the image of who can be in computer science, and to engage teachers and students in computational concepts and hands-on computing activities. This year we've seen a growth spurt in enrollments of women in the CS major and a steady demand for our outreach programs.